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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: demonstrations, clashes with the police, and tear gas in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes, it's obvious, and sometimes, it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> bnsf railway support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fromiers like you. thank you. >> brown: there was no let-up today in the battle between israel and hamas, the palestinian group that rules gaza. air strikes echoed across gaza, and rockets landed near tel aviv and, for the firs
buster, a tactic used to delay legislation but republicans say the tool is key to protecting their minority rights. >> warner: on the eve of world aids day, ray suarez updates the hopes and frustrations in the fight against the deadly disease. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> warner: and is the grand canyon 60 million years older than we've long thought? we ask science correspondent miles o'brien. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've b
to this special edition of the newshour. kwame holman starts us off tonight with an election day wrap-up. then, we take the temperature at the campaigns' headquarters, with ray suarez in chicago and margaret warner in boston. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks join us with their analysis. >> ifill: jeffrey brown on who's voting and why, plus key congressional races with christina bellantoni and stuart rothenberg. >> woodruff: we get historical perspective from michael beschloss and richard norton smith. >> ifill: and hari sreenvasan shows how you can find the latest results online at our data-driven map center. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. when i was in an accident i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own. with united health care i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from, and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more tha
in need of a spark find one in october? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.9% as more
and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >> reporter: mr. obama departed his hometown of chicago this afternoon for washington, his home for another four years. waiting for him: a still- divided congress now facing a critical lame duck session.
night, the american people voted for action, not politics as usual. you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. and in that spirit, i've invited leaders of both parties to the white house next week so we can start to build consensus around the challenges that we can only solve together. last year, i worked with democrats and republicans to cut a trillion dollars worth of spending that we just couldn't afford. i intend to work with both parties to do more, and that includes making reforms that will bring down the cost of health care so we can strengthen programs like medicaid and medicare for the long haul. i've put forward a detailed plan that allows us to make these investments, while reducing our deficit by $4 trillion over the next decade. i want to be clear-- i'm not wedded to every detail of my plan. i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me making ove
closed just a moment ago at theag the hour. using exit polling data and surveys of early voters, the associated press is beginning to project a winner in a number of states. we're going to be watching for that as soon as we get it. i'm told, gwen, we do haveoneon call. the networks, two television networks are projecting the state of kentucky will go for mitt romney which is not a surprise. a state that john mccain won four years ago. >> ifill: not a big surprise. all of these results will-jump-starting the all-important electoral college count. 270 is the magic numberne candidate has to reach to become the next president. right now the associated press is predicting nothing because we don't know yet what is going to happen with those electoral votes. but we're waiting. >> woodruff: i just now am being told, gwen, and this information is comingnn as we're sitting here. the sta of indiana has been projected. mitt romney is projected the winner in the state of indiana. that is a state barackbama won narrow w but he did win it four years ago. but this is not a surprise. it was expe
in recent days. up here in north gaza, close to the frontier with israel, people are used to the airstrikes that come, the craters that pockmark the countryside and that destroy their buildings. let's face, it's happened now every few years. so when you come here, you'll find a sense of relief and immediate happiness, of course, but people are pretty skeptical about whether the peace will last. >> ( translated ): god willing i hope it holds but i'm 50/50. they've been breaking their promises since the prophet's day. >> reporter: mobility scooter meets hamas flag. ahmed atah lost both legs in the last israeli invasion. so, will a ceasefire become a peace? "it could," he said, "but first we need to give thanks to president morsi of egypt." across gaza, he's something of a new hero, and they're even impressed in israel. the egyptian president right now the best hope for peacekeeping here. >> egypt was able to regain it's regional role as a regional player, mediating between the israelis and the palestinians in convincing both of them to reach a ceasefire agreement. in the city, the flags, the
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)